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April 29th, 2007


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03:34 pm - "There's no room on this planet for another race of people."
La Who Review for this week. With random jaunts into Why You Can't Trust Reviews By Other People, Some (Pop) Psychological Discussion Of Martha, and Why Freud Makes More Sense In Fiction Than Reality. And a definition of Danversing.

Non spoiler version: Since getting this episode too rather longer than usual, I went and spoiled myself on other people's reviews - and thus, was expecting to not like this episode. So it was to my surprise that I did like it - as with last week, like rather than love, but I definitely rate this higher than the first two-parters of the previous series'. And I find some of the criticisms from people I normally agree with quite puzzling, but more in the land of spoilerdom...


Getting it out first, then: All the talk of the Doctor being a bastard to Martha in this episode? I just don't see it at all. The closest there was, was the Doctor's "No time for hugging" bit, and since I think he initiated that, it comes off less as a rejection, and more a "Oh shit, bad stuff's still happening!" Which is a realisation he probably could have used in Tooth and Claw, srsly

Yeah, they spent a lot of the episode apart, but when they were together? Aside from the aforementioned Twirly!Hug, there was the Doctor, repeatedly, giving Martha job to do. Trusting her, showing faith in her abilities, not just to help people out in her trained manner, but to go beyond, to helping save the freaking world. In giving her the psychic paper, Martha was effectively deputised to the Doctor. Not just doctor in training, but Doctor in training. (Remember School Reunion, and the subtexts of Sarah Jane getting the Sonic Screwdriver, rather than Rose who expected it?) he even had her own companions, to hand her equipment and tell her how wonderful she was. That medical student Chekov's Gun is looking more and more relevent now...

Even Tallulah commented on it. (Bringing the Chekov's Gun to audience attention? We shall have to see) They make a good team. And she so called him on him trying to make her stay out of trouble, running and hiding.

Speaking of that conversation, the Tallulah convo with Martha seems the trigger for said accusations of bastardry. But the key bit is, we've seen most of the Doctor/Martha dynamic (with the Gridlock-DiM gap as notable exception), and she is referring in past tense, so it seems (to me at least) that most of Martha's woes are triggered by the TSC conversation of actual bastardness, and the well warranted rebound accusation in Gridlock.

(Also, it has lead me to conclude that all the problems in the Doctor/Martha relationship are caused by TSC. QED)

So, my post yesterday feels a bit prophetic. The Doctor/Martha relationship seems rather like Rebecca (From the POV of the new Mrs de Winter/Martha). The new companionwife feels she is haunted by the metaphorical ghost of the previous one. She's been swept of her feet, but when they return to his home and she's suddenly out of her depth. She is told she isn't nearly as good as RoseRebecca. She finds she is being made out as the same when she is at the ballon New Earth.

So... when's the other shoe going to drop? When's the relationship between the DoctorMax and RoseRebecca going to be shown as other than the untrue ideal the new girl is seeing?

Huh. In any case, I am now referring to any situation when Rosefen desperately go on about how utterly perfect Rose and her love were, and how Martha can never possibly compare as Danversing. Because I find the analogy fits rather well.

Another thing you can read out of said conversation with Martha - and I see a couple of others have picked up on this - is that you can see a possibly what might be the major psychological issue with Martha. Where Rose had a sort of need for identity, and selfishness, Martha seems to have an inferiority/insecurity thing about if people genuinely like her for her, or just the place she is filling in their lives. It showed up in one of the pre-series Blog Posts, and looking at her family in Smith and Jones, you can kind of see a root to it - everyone turns to Martha in order to sort things out. She's used by Annalise to argue with Francine. It's not an insecurity about what he can do - she's plenty confident of that. But if you want things done, where do you go? To the person who does them. And just when she thinks she's got an escape from this, she finds herself (or so she thinks) placed in this position by the Doctor. Again.

Martha's family background gives some very obvious Pop Psychology reasoning for this - parent divorced messily, and it's not unlikely the children were an issue there, effectively being used as an item rather than as the people themselves (Plus, it might explain why Martha is used to acting as intermediary). Not to mention the middle child thing. Pop Psychology is big on this one. Used to being the ignored one, the one stuck in the middle, who has to fight for attention, to not be considered a replica of another sibling. Insecure in their position, as neither the responsible older one, or the baby of the family. Diplomat, peacemaker, feeling like they are lacking in significance, often over-achieves to get the attention they feel is deserved (hello, medical school). Ringing any bells?

Note to self: When I have some free time, check if there are any actual academic studies on the impact of birth order on personality. I'm sure there's something more recent.

In any case, fiction doesn't need to obey the laws of reality. Fiction needs to make moresense then reality. Because we only get a few pages/hours of someone, a lifetime os reduced to shorthand, and pop psychology, for all it mightn't be actually true, has a logic to it that makes sense. Rose had that only child confidence that she's the centre of the world, and Martha has the middle child feeling of being ignored. This stuff has to mean something in fiction, because what you can say is limited.

It's like Freud. An awful lot of his theories have been discredited psychologically, but that doesn't change the fact there are huge amounts of Freudian literary analysis still carried out. And it makes sense - unlike reality, fiction is representative. It's a symbolic medium, and generally symbols mean something. Whereas in reality... things don't have to mean anything. They just are.

In any case, I probably ought to end this tangent before someone tried to differentiate it. Or something.

So, the rest of this episode.

There was some interesting stuff in this episode on humanity. Yeah, a lot of yay humans, but that bit the Human Dalek said at the start, about war and hate and whatnot? He's not wrong. Humanity is that. They are so much more, but there is a nasty streak in them.

Daleks gossiping and looking behind to see if anyone is listening = so very much win. It's like a lunchbreak chat about Sec's new plastic surgery. Or something.

Also, Solomon honey, you can't monologue at the villains like that, and expect to come out of it okay. Only recurring characters can do that. The exterminate after "What do you say?" was inevitable, really. (And Sec flinched... that human stuff is getting to him)

I'm trying to work out if the Doctor has a Cunning Plan, or just a death wish. Or if he's being very risky, and playing the odds about Sec. Using himself as a poker chip?

As others have said, I was trying very hard not to compare Martha's "What about us?" with Rose's "What about meee!" Or the fact that Rose committed genocide, and only ever brought it up again to be cocky in the dalek's faces, whereas Martha immediately responded by freaking out about the fact she had killed people. No fairytales for Martha, just the painful reality

And Martha is smart, and helpful, and with her fabulous companions works out what's going on. (Is Martha as to Frank and Tallulah as the Doctor as to Martha? Discuss.)

The Daleks... really haven't read the Evil Overlord list, have they? Giving away their plan like that. That said, if Human Dalek Sec genuinely wants help (To save himself, or his species? His species to survive, or to conquer?), well, giving all the info does inspire trust. And he said Davros was wrong! And lo, did the other Daleks plot mutiny. The Doctor can't believe it either.

Lovely view up the Empire State Building, I must say.

"I know that one man can change the course of history. One idea in the right place at the time right time, that's all it takes. I've got to believe it's possible."

Aside from being a neat line and, you know, what Doctor Who is all about, I'm wondering if this line might have further consequences this series. "Don't you think she looks tired" was an idea, too...

Inevitable Dalek Mutiny! Will they strand Sec on an island with a pistol with one shot left?

"You told us to imagine, and we imagined your irrelevance." I love bitchy Daleks.

The Doctor trusts Martha to fight, to hold her own. Does he expect her to live through it, I'm not sure? He's playing high stakes, here, and I'm not sure if he's bluffing. It's sort of adorably awesome, though.

The pigslaves in the lift cracked me up. All they needed was elevator music...

And Martha is smart. And freaks out when she realises the consequences of it. And needs someone to tell her it's okay, they are already dead. I had a flashback to Adeola, there.

Dude, Doctor, what are you up to with the electrocution thing? Given he doesn't seem surprised - or all that hurt - when Martha and co show up, I don't think this was a death wish thing. Especially given the later Time Lord DNA stuff - I'd say last minute plan, not intended fatally. But the Doctor, lately, has been running some plans that have some seriously high levels of chance going - see also Smith and Jones. Did he expect Martha to save his life, or was he giving up the regeneration? The frequency, the fact he doesn't seem hugely surprised to end up alive, and trusting Martha to do what she must, it strikes me as having both incredible faith in her, and playing some seriously chancy odds. Getting a bit Sevenish prior to Human Nature?

He was very pretty unconscious on the spire, though. Though the New York at night backdrop helped.

And showdown in a theatre. Bless. I rather like. Especially Martha refusing to run and hide, and calling him on giving her orders.

Sec in chains is way too kinky for my liking. But bless him, dying to save the Doctor. (It wasn't an entirely noble action, given he wanted the Doctor to, you know, save the race so they could start exterminating all over again

There was mondo religious imagery in that scene, I have to say. Christ pose!Doctor, talking about baptising the human hybrid whatsits in his blood. (And when you find they have Time Lord DNA, willing to die for his people. Ho boy)

And questioning hybrid!people. And then Dalek Caan wipes them all out. And the Doctor loses yet another connection to his race. To another genocide. Ouch.

And so it ends, with just one Time Lord, and one Dalek (filmed in that incredibly western showdown way). "What do you say?"

And instead of Exterminate, which Solomon got, we have Emergency Temporal Shift. Are we supposed to keep the Solomon = Doctor analogy going, or has it changed now? I'm not sure. Also, as much as it bothers some people that the Daleks still exist, at least we get an explanation rather than, "They're all dead! Surprise, no they aren't." But Dalek Caan - insert KHAAAAAN joke here - could be anywhere and anywhen. Do we expect paranoid Doctor now? For the very first time, he knows there are is still a Dalek in existance.

And yet... in that confrontation, you could see why the Doctor refused to commit genocide (There's a bit of a genocide theme in this episode. Martha and the pig slaves, the Daleks and the human hybrid whatsits... and the Doctor, refusing once more). He knows that guilt, and he wants no more part of it. And he knows the loneliness of being the last, and wants to prevent that, too.

Saving Laszlo was good, though. Especially given the number of people who died. (Which is over a 1000, if we are talking offscreen implied)

"There's been too many deaths today, way too many people have died. Brand new creatures, and wise old men, and age old enemies. And I'm telling you, I'm telling you right now, I am not having one more death. You got that? Not one! Tallulah, out of the way! The Doctor is in!"

Ending with the same lines that it started with - almost. I'm a sucker for that sort of ending, really. And forboding look, as we ponder the very last Dalek - for now, anyway.


So, well, there's rather a lot to talk about for an episode that is mostly a popcorn movie, don't think too hard type. (I gleefully ignored the dodgy science, given that, well, Doctor Who is practically based on dodgy science. I'll live)
Current Mood: thoughtfulthoughtful

(58 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:stickmarionette
Date:April 29th, 2007 08:40 am (UTC)
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THANK YOU OMG SOMEONE I AGREE WITH. *cough* Ahem, sorry, I'm just frustrated at the wave of 'omg Ten's such a bastard, Martha should leeeeeeeeeeeave him'.

Which is a realisation he probably could have used in Tooth and Claw, srsly
Which means that Martha makes him act less annoying, which is a good thing, no?

Totally agree with you about TSC. Well, just one scene in TSC, really. 'Cause the rest of the time they were being fantastically shippy.

It's like a lunchbreak chat about Sec's new plastic surgery.
YES OMG absolutely.

I'm trying to work out if the Doctor has a Cunning Plan, or just a death wish.
I kinda read it as both. He is a bit unstable, but there's a lot going on underneath even that.

I really loved the Christ-pose/baptism speech combination in the theatre scene. That line gave me shivers.

Laszlo lives! That was a great speech. Actually, this episode was good for great speeches. The one at the beginning was awesome too.
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 09:12 am (UTC)
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The thing is, I do think Ten should be hit with a clue-by-four, and I am looking forward to Martha being asked permanently aboard (Particularly the conversation around that). I just don't see why this particular episode has got everyone all het up.

Which means that Martha makes him act less annoying, which is a good thing, no?

Oh, indeed. And I finding blaming everything on that scene in TSC works quite well.

I kinda read it as both. He is a bit unstable, but there's a lot going on underneath even that.

That's probably the most logical explanation. (I've just seen someone claim this episode as evidence the Doctor doesn't want to go on without Rose. Sigh. 'Cos it's not like he didn't climb a zappy tower in, say, The Idiot's Lantern or anything)
[User Picture]
From:xwingace
Date:April 29th, 2007 09:59 am (UTC)
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I disliked this ep, but it had nothing to do with shippiness or lack of it. The whole speechifying, spelling everything out three or four times, not getting to the point of it ticked me off. Plus the even-dodgier-than-usual science. I can ignore dodgy science up to a point, if it makes internal sense. This didn't.

Oh, and Sec was even less believable now than he was in his final moments of the last ep. I was honestly glad he got exterminated, because now we'll never have to see him again.

XWA
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 10:32 am (UTC)
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Well, everyone's entitled to their own opinion. I was just saying that people shouldn't let others opinions sway them.
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From:evilgeniuslady
Date:April 29th, 2007 10:26 am (UTC)
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The Doctor's being a typical man, completely failing to pick up on those little moments where Martha could need a smile or just some sort of reassurance. But a bastard? No. He was bastard enough in TSC for her to still be legitimately hurting from that.

I like your Pop Psychology analysis of Martha, and pretty much agree.

I loved how dark the Doctor was in this. Standing in front of the humans in Hooverville was insanely suicidal - he had no real reason to suspect the Daleks wouldn't exterminate him on sight. Everything he did after that was merely a logical extension of the way that first stand-off played out. (Also, Tennant gives pretty unconscious and near-death. He really does.)


Also, I just saw someone claim that the tune the radio played when the Doctor first turned it on was a reference to Rose. Much as I'm all for subtext and all that, I completely fail to see how a radio playing a bit of episode-contemporary music is proof that he's still mourning the loss of his Twue Love (it's not even Glenn Miller, just a random piece of dance music!). I must have misplaced my overly-shippy glasses somewhere...
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 10:40 am (UTC)
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The Doctor's being a typical man, completely failing to pick up on those little moments where Martha could need a smile or just some sort of reassurance.

I think he just needs to say, just once, that he wants Martha travelling with him because he likes her for her, and not for any other purpose. Hopefully there'll be something along those lines next week.

I like your Pop Psychology analysis of Martha, and pretty much agree.

Pop Psychology is fun, in that it's more the psychology of stories than reality. So it always seems to follow obvious rules.

Standing in front of the humans in Hooverville was insanely suicidal - he had no real reason to suspect the Daleks wouldn't exterminate him on sight.

Thinking about it, the electricity wasn't a threat, given we know from the Slitheen attack the Doctor can survive large currents. But it was till, yeah, playing the odds and hoping to win, rather than knowing he was right at Hooverville.

Also, I just saw someone claim that the tune the radio played when the Doctor first turned it on was a reference to Rose.

They try so hard, don't they? Bless them and their Danversing. (See, if you want over-read shippiness, I'd start with the fact that in TSC, the Doctor repeatedly interrupts Shakespeare everytime he starts flirting with Martha...)

[User Picture]
From:malaleen
Date:April 29th, 2007 12:21 pm (UTC)
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While I'm not sure I liked the episode as much as you did (I found it rather blah), I agreed with all the points you made. I picked up on the inferiority complex of Martha and how it could relate back to her family too, though I think it goes back farther than just that scene in the Shakespeare Code. I think it really started at the end of S&J when the Doctor rebuffed her advances and first mentioned Rose, though I think SC cemented the idea in Martha's head that'd she'd never measure up to Rose.

Honestly, I just think the Doctor's being clueless about how Martha is feeling, which is pretty much par for the course with him. I think the reason he hasn't asked Martha on full time is because for two basic reasons. One: he doesn't want to get attached again and lose her like he did Rose. And two: he knows that Martha doesn't want to stay on full time, as she has a life to lead. Martha isn't like Rose, where she's being plucked out of her mundane life of beans on toast and telly. She has a purpose and a vision of what she wants out of life, or so the Doctor thinks. Right now, he's probably thinking returning her to her life is what she wants, clueless alien that he is.

Sorry for the ramble in your lj.
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From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 12:39 pm (UTC)
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Personally, I think it's just all the stuff I read before seeing it were so critical that I was expecting very little. And thus it exceeded my (lowered) expectations. And that's all it takes to make me happy.

That's an interesting thought, about the Doctor not wanting to interfere in Martha's plans. So I shall be very interested in what goes down in the next episode, indeed.
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From:gryffinclaw
Date:April 29th, 2007 12:36 pm (UTC)
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I was not annoyed by what Ten said in this episode. Considering I am huge Martha/Ten person that is a big deal lol.

All I want is for ten to ask her to stay. He already appriciates her, we can see that. He knows she is smart, he knows she can be an asset he knows she can look after herself.

Damit, just make the girl feel welcome. I mean you were the one who asked her abord the Tardis and turned one trip into four, just ask her properly! Politely!

I LOVED Martha yelling at him. Loved it!
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 12:41 pm (UTC)
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I expect that's whats due to happen next ep.

...And I just realised I'm saying that in relation to all these comments. But it is a key episode, in the scheme of things, character-wise. If nothing else, because it's when the one trip only gets rejected, and the Doctor admits he wants her around on a more permanent basis.
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From:darenothope
Date:April 29th, 2007 02:35 pm (UTC)
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The Doctor being a bastard to Martha stuff. You're right, he really didn't do anything bastardly at all to Martha in this ep. But for some reason in this ep I just felt he wasn't being particularly nice to Martha which isn't the case at all as you pointed out. When Martha said that stuff about the Doctor not seeing her but remembering Rose that made me go all 'Doctor is a bastard' mode. Although, whether he said it in jest or not, the line about "Never waste time on a hug" bugged me immensely.

I am now referring to any situation when Rosefen desperately go on about how utterly perfect Rose and her love were, and how Martha can never possibly compare as Danversing.
Just curious, what's Danversing? And the whole perfect Rose and how Martha can't possibly compare reminds me of Smallville fandom where Chloe=Rose and Lois=Martha. Was amused by the similarity.

Where Rose had a sort of need for identity, and selfishness, Martha seems to have an inferiority/insecurity thing about if people genuinely like her for her, or just the place she is filling in their lives.
Now that's really interesting. I hdan't thought of Martha like that. I liked how you used the Martha Jones myspace blogs. I read through them and didn't really give them a second thought.

For some reason I thought that Martha was the eldest child, because she looks older than Tish.

Reading your review was highly entertaining and insightful and has distracted me from actual uni work. So thanks. =D

[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 02:45 pm (UTC)
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It's interesting the number of people who defaulted to the bastard!Doctor thing on those words. I'm curious as to how much of the general public went that way, too. (Given that's who the show is aimed at, and if a significant number of them reacted that way, is likely an indication that my little part of fandom is picking up on something intentional)

Just curious, what's Danversing?

It makes more sense if you know about the book Rebecca. Basically, a widower sweeps a women of her feet, and remarries. When he takes her home, she initially has to put up with Mrs Danvers, the house-keeper, who was devoted to Rebecca - the dead wife - and spends a lot of time making the new wife feel uncomfortable, unwanted, and as if she could never live up to Rebecca's memory.

I think certain proportions of fandom are treating Martha like Mrs Danvers did the new wife. Ie, Danversing.

For some reason I thought that Martha was the eldest child, because she looks older than Tish.

She's definitely meant to be middle child, but going by Doctor Who Magazine, Tish is only meant to be a year older.

[User Picture]
From:neadods
Date:April 29th, 2007 02:52 pm (UTC)
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Y'know, I think you should post a version of this on fanthropology on the basis that "Danversing" is something that happens in a lot of fandoms and it's such a great term.
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 03:05 pm (UTC)
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Interesting idea, but I suspect it'll have to wait for a time when it's not, you know, the middle of the night here.

I'm also trying to think of examples in other fandoms. Riley in Buffy, perhaps?
From:narm00
Date:April 29th, 2007 03:05 pm (UTC)
(Link)
And yet... in that confrontation, you could see why the Doctor refused to commit genocide (There's a bit of a genocide theme in this episode. Martha and the pig slaves, the Daleks and the human hybrid whatsits... and the Doctor, refusing once more). He knows that guilt, and he wants no more part of it. And he knows the loneliness of being the last, and wants to prevent that, too.


Mm. Been thinking about this. People are complaining it's out-of-character for Ten: this is the guy who killed the Racnoss, who lost everything to the Daleks, including this episode's hybrids. He should have gone ahead.

Except, except, except...

Yes, the Doctor could have picked up one of the hybrids' guns and faced off in a /literal/ shootout, but to my mind, that would have pushed the tone of the episode just that little /too/ far. By the end of the story, Martha, the Doctor, and Caan would all have committed genocide. And that would have been out-of-tone with the story as it stood. This is a story that offers the possibility of salvation, of second chances: for the Daleks, for the hybrids, for Laszlo and Tallulah.

The Daleks deny the hybrids, and themselves, that second chance. Why shouldn't the Doctor make it final?

Because a Doctor who killed Caan would have had little ground to offer Laszlo another chance. There would have been no second chances for anyone in the story, including the Doctor.

Tenth's darkness is /not/ that of a genocide. It's that of the Lonely God, the God with nothing else to fall back on, nowhere else to go, nothing else to risk. That's why he can throw himself in front of the Daleks in Hooverville.

And he fears committing himself to Martha, to having something to lose again...
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 29th, 2007 03:24 pm (UTC)
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Oh, I like that. I really quite like that...
[User Picture]
From:calapine
Date:April 29th, 2007 04:19 pm (UTC)
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*clings to opening paragraphs*

Yes, all his actions indicate Good Things.
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 30th, 2007 10:14 am (UTC)
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All he has to do is admit it to Martha, and I think we're set.
[User Picture]
From:buckbeakbabie
Date:April 29th, 2007 06:43 pm (UTC)
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I gleefully ignored the dodgy science, given that, well, Doctor Who is practically based on dodgy science.

Hee, yeah. Gotta love the dodgy science. My favourite was the intravenous solutions in New Earth fixing everyone. XD

Or the fact that Rose committed genocide, and only ever brought it up again to be cocky in the dalek's faces, whereas Martha immediately responded by freaking out about the fact she had killed people. No fairytales for Martha, just the painful reality

I loved that reaction from Martha. We never saw Rose actually find out what she did while being all Bad Wolf-y. She didn't remember it in TCI, but had found out what happened by Doomsday. So she may have had a freak-out of her own. Though not as bad as the one she most likely had when she realised she technically killed the Doctor, too. XD
[User Picture]
From:drakyndra
Date:April 30th, 2007 10:19 am (UTC)
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Hee, yeah. Gotta love the dodgy science.

Reverse the polarity of the neutron flow, anyone? ;)

So she may have had a freak-out of her own. Though not as bad as the one she most likely had when she realised she technically killed the Doctor, too.

That would have been... interesting to see, really.

Though I think it's just an age thing - Rose is so young, that with the exception of a Father she can't remember at all, death hasn't really touched her. She's still at the thinking she's immortal stage. And as such, I don't think she really comprehends the significance of it at that level. (Whereas to be a med student, Martha would have seen death. Basic anatomy classes involve dissection corpses, and she would deal with seeing patients die. So she has a better understanding of what it means)
From:threeoranges
Date:May 11th, 2007 08:56 pm (UTC)
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I missed this episode, but really I was only interested in whether Pigboy got his face back. My husband says he didn't.

Was it ever explained why the Doctor couldn't just take him to a planet with advanced plastic surgery and give him a more acceptable face? I mean, did the girlfriend suddenly develop a tusk fetish or sthg?

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